CivilWars{1} The Legend of Korra Season 2 Episode 3 Watch Free s02e03 Online HD

CivilWars{1} The Legend of Korra Season 2 Episode 3 Watch Free s02e03 Online HD

Legend of Korra Season 2 Episode 3 It may have been a mistake to use Korra losing her powers as a finale in this first series, because there’s just no way to win there. You take her powers away permanently, or at least unless late on in series two, there's a good chance you’re going to lose some of

<strong><a href="http://tvshoows.blogspot.com/2013/09/watch-legend-of-korra-season-2-episode.html">===>>>> CLICK HERE TO WATCH FULL EPISODE <<<<===</a></strong>

<strong><a href="http://tvshoows.blogspot.com/2013/09/watch-legend-of-korra-season-2-episode.html">===>>>> CLICK HERE TO WATCH FULL EPISODE <<<<===</a></strong>

<strong><a href="http://tvshoows.blogspot.com/2013/09/watch-legend-of-korra-season-2-episode.html">===>>>> CLICK HERE TO WATCH FULL EPISODE <<<<===</a></strong>

your audience Legend of Korra Season 2 Episode 3 (if we assume there are a bunch of people watching ‘Korra’ hoping to see a female character guaranteed a supernaturally powerful role). 'The Legend of Korra' is somewhere between a sequel to and a spin off from 'Avatar: The Last Airbender'. It's set in the same world as Avatar, but 70 years later, and it features an entirely new cast of characters. There are, however, several links with the events of 'Avatar' - you learn a lot about how the events at the end of the third and final series affected the world, and you even get glimpses into the lives of beloved Avatar characters through flashbacks. You might remember how much we enjoyed Avatar from last year's posts; to find out our thoughts on 'The Legend of Korra', dive in.Jodie: Shall I be the terrible one and start us off with the obvious question - how do you think 'The Legend of Korra' compares to 'Avatar: The Last Airbender'? I want that question to encompass a few things: Do you think this program is distinct from 'Avatar' or similar? How did you feel about the program's approach to various political aspects compared to the approach of 'Avatar'? And did you love this program as much as 'Avatar'? That's a heap of questions so shall we take them one by one? First (ha, see this is the pushy lady you get when you let me start the doc) did you think 'Korra' was its own, creative entity and did you see any similarities between 'Korra' and 'Avatar'? Ana: I'll start by acknowledging that having read Gene Luen Yang's The Promise trilogy will affect my answer to these questions. The comics allowed me to see how the world of Avatar: The Last Airbender became the world of The Legend of Korra, and as a result the transition felt more natural to me than it might have otherwise.

I have no doubt that my background influenced how I read it, but to me Korra's "you're oppressing yourselves!" line was impossible to take seriously - it's too much like something out of a Bingo card, you know? I mean, I know Bingo cards exist because there's no shortage of people out there in the real world who says the things in them with an absolute straight face, but but but! Surely the writers know better? This, by the way, is a description of my inner monologue as I watched, not an assertion I'm actually making -- and in any case, the writers' intent is not the most interesting thing to consider about that line. It's just that because Korra is portrayed as a character who doesn't have definite answers for the big questions she's struggling with, and who's definitely not above being wrong. So at the time, I read the line as an expression of a certain kind of insulated privilege Korra embodied, and I thought it was really interesting and refreshing that the series was going to make us sympathise with its protagonist and show us that she was capable of that. She was the heroine, but she was basically embarrassing herself when she said that. Stories that show viewers that being ignorant and defensive and dismissive of other people's concerns because of your privilege is not something that other people do, or something that makes you an irredeemably terrible person (provided you're willing to learn), are exciting and important, and I think we don't have nearly enough of them. However, the series came to an end before they could do much with any of that, which is why I'm also clinging to that "you're our Avatar too" line. Come on, season two! Surely you'll address the fact that the non-benders had completely legitimate concerns? That non-violent protest is possible (which I totally agree the series didn't really acknowledge)? That sometimes people become radicalised for very good reasons, and that all that anger isn't a force for evil but one for positive and necessary social change? I mean, why did people follow Amon? There was something to his message that resonated with them -- why was that the case? These are all such exciting, relevant themes, and like you said there's so much potential there. Please don't let me down, season two! In sum, I, too, wanted more complexity and detail; but I still feel that I need to watch the second season to make up my mind for good about whether or not the treatment of these themes was disappointing.

But yes, I absolutely agree that any of those responses is totally fine; as is, I don't know, simultaneously responding to the series in seemingly contradictory ways. Nothing wrong with being of two minds (she tells herself). Also, I love that you brought up our discussion about Regina in Once Upon a Time because that's a great example of a time where I couldn't get over the textual clues that encouraged me NOT to sympathise with a character, even though my natural inclination was to read her positively and I could see how the series didn't completely close the door on more generous interpretations of her storyline. But something about how the narrative handled Regina crossed my own personal line in ways that were enough to put me off the show, whereas I know you and Clare felt differently. To me, the important thing about these discussions is to acknowledge that smart people, and also people who share the same values and care about the same things, can very easily disagree, as Ana Mardoll so well says. My favourite fannish discussions are the ones that acknowledge that, and hopefully we do a decent job ourselves of getting that idea across here at LB. The more time I spend observing my reactions to different stories and how I make sense of them, the more I realise that there really is no clear cut answer or definite formula to predict these things. I don't know why I'm more forgiving of some stories and demand that others take sides more explicitly, but these days I'm also more comfortable with only being able to figure it out on a case by case basis.

At the same time removing Korra’s bending would fall into a gendered trope of disempowering heroines. Sure, Korra could come to find different forms of power in series two, but at the end of series one she would be in the typical knocked down position of many a heroine badly treated by her media. For me to feel comfortable with the creators ending the first series of ‘Korra’ with its female Avatar disempowered and desolate, in the terms of the program’s world, I’d have to really trust them to develop Korra’s story meaningfully and to give Korra the opportunity to take on some different kind of power later. Right now the trust that the previous ‘Avatar’ project built up by being consistently decent is helping me to wait and see just how the program handles the complaints of non-benders in series two. But if I were asked to suspend any other judgement until series two I think I'd find it difficult. It's a lot to ask for a viewer to hang out and see how everything turns out in the next series before forming any opinions on the strength of previous, satisfying projects and personally I would have felt that leaving Korra on a forlorn cliffhanger was step too far.

Saying that, the ending where Korra's powers are restored is dramatically rushed and does take the easy way out – contrary me apparently wouldn’t have liked the ending of this series whichever way they’d written it! I’d actually say You bring her powers back straight after she’s lost them and it’s a dramatic error which messes up the pace of your show and its emotional impact. If the loss of her powers had come at the end of the second series I think there would have been a lot more scope for the interesting developments you describe above to take place in the series three without endangering fan support. Trust might then have carried the audience (ok, ok, me, I'm talking about meagain) through any concerns about 'Korra' turning into yet another piece of visual media that totally disempowers its heroine. If the program gave me powerful bending Korra for series one and series two, then took her powers in series three I'd be more inclined to hang around and wait to see exactly how they treated Korra after taking away her bending.

The quick resolution of this plotline and just the general odd, too fast pacing of the program makes me wonder if there were internal concerns that the program might not get a second series. Series one is a complete product; it contains resolutions which make this series feel like a neatly tied up standalone story. The romance is sealed with a kiss, the villain is dead and everyone gets their powers back. There’s no, 'so what really did happen to Zuko’s mother' moment, y’know? And considering that these resolutions feel forced and way too fast I wonder what was going on behind the scenes. I find it really difficult to image the team behind ‘Avatar’ just so badly not getting how a drama should be paced... Were there issues that forced the way they paced this series? Speculation abounds! Ana: You know, I hadn't considered that tradition of disempowerment at all, but that's such a great point. I guess the way I envisioned it in my head, losing her bending abilities would not so much put Korra in a position of weakness as open the door to a deep questioning of the link between bending and power in her world. Of course, this would require a radical revision of power structures in the world of Avatar, which is both exactly what I want and something that I understand is impossible to accomplish quickly. Having said that, while you can change the rules of the game when it comes to the social power associated with bending, things are a lot trickier when it comes to how her supernatural powers enable her to be so competent physically when it comes to sports or fighting. And I definitely wouldn't want to see that taken away from a female heroine either. So yeah, they did place themselves in a situation where it's impossible to win, and I suspect you might be spot on about there being non-storytelling issues influencing how this season was paced and how rushed the ending was. Only time will tell what season two holds in store for us. Whenever it comes out, I look forward to discussing it with you :D